Ready for a Job Change? You Need to Learn how to Job Search

Job search1 300x225 Ready for a Job Change? You Need to Learn how to Job SearchA recent story in Forbes asks an intriguing question: Is it possible to make a career change even in today’s gloomy economy? The answer that Forbes writer Chrissy Scivicque comes up with is an unqualified “yes.” But to make a professional job change, one that you plan out carefully, you must know how to job search.

Changing careers is risky in any economy. It’s an especially daunting task, though, in an economy in which so many are out of work and looking for the same jobs that you’ll want to land. That’s why knowing the best way to job search – here’s a hint: It’s all about networking – is a critical skill today.

Making a Career Change

In her story, Scivicque acknowledges the risks that employees face today when they quit a job they already hold to find a career that is more satisfying to them. As all those job seekers who have been unemployed for months or longer will say, it’s far from easy to land a new job in today’s hiring environment.

This doesn’t mean, though, that making a career change is a bad idea today. The worst idea is to remain in a job that you don’t like or, worse yet, hate because it is safe.

Work shouldn’t be a Chore

 We all spend too many hours at work. If that’s the case – and with the weak economy budget-strapped companies are asking employees to take on even more work – then we need those hours we spend in the office, in front of our computers, or in the field to be as satisfying as possible. This is where making a career change comes in. It’s important for hard-working employees to find a job about which they are passionate.

But how to make this career change? Not surprisingly the best of all the job search strategies remains one of the oldest: networking.

Networking should be Natural

Many blanch at this word, but networking isn’t that complicated and it doesn’t have to be awkward. Basically, it involves talking to past co-workers, former bosses, favored college professors, neighbors, family members, and friends about your career goals. Once your network of acquaintances, friends, and business contacts knows that you are actively seeking a new line of work, they can inform you of unadvertised openings in your desired field, companies that are expanding, or rivals who are retiring. They might even be able to offer personal or written recommendations to hiring managers in the field you are striving to crack.

So don’t resist the urge to make a professional job change. Work shouldn’t be drudgery; it should be challenging and interesting. Start networking and stop merely dreaming of that ideal job.

If you need help making a career change, sign up for our Get Hired Bootcamp. We can provide you with the tools you need to make your dream a reality.

, , , , , , ,